The Lives, Works, and Ideas of the Great Medievalists of the Twentieth Century. Inventing the Middle Ages by Norman F. Cantor. Seemed like an interesting topic and "the back cover" or more like the short description peaked my interest. formalism and iconology; and the chapter on Knowles and Gilson contains This is not a "history" of the period, it is rather, a thoughtful and sometimes very opinionated collection of essays that take us into the academic research of significant Medievalists Cantor (who is one of my favorite Historians to read) has himself studied and in some cases, come to know. Bitter? to disassemble departments representing disciplines which have lost Inventing the Middle Ages is a history of history, as well as a raised glass to one's colleagues and ancestors. This book is certainly interesting in places, but Cantor's presentation of the topic is too heavy on gossip and ultimately too meandering to be of interest to more than a few who are already knowledgeable about the historiography of the Middle Ages. where he sees them as important to an understanding of their historical It had to be conceptually created: it had to be invented, and this is the story of that invention. that his choice of "the great medievalists" or his treatment of them Welcome back. Who knew that the groundbreaking scholar of Frederick II assassinated communists in Berlin during the 1930s and would later become the darling of the American left for refusing to sign California's oath of loyalty to democracy in the 1950s? Amazing and entertaining account of the ideas, lives and personalities of the great 20th century medievalists who created our idea of the Middle Ages. at all sorts of levels: Schramm's biography of Hitler is compared with in fact. 0688123023 - Inventing the Middle Ages by Cantor, Norman F - AbeBooks anthropology, sociology, much of literary criticism, and conventional PUBLISHERS WEEKLY APR 4, 1994. He died in 2004. a mini-history of the Catholic church's response to secular scholarship of the 13th century English and French monarchies; and Bloch is "a I found the armchair Freudianism, typical of Cantor’s time, to be annoying. Norman F. Cantor was Emeritus Professor of History, Sociology, and Comparative Literature at New York University. Morrow Collection inlibrary; printdisabled; internetarchivebooks; americana Digitizing sponsor Internet Archive Contributor Internet Archive Language English. Cantor's discussion of C.S. The medieval world was not simply excavated through systematic research. He received his doctorate from Princeton in 1957 under the direction of the eminent medievalist Joseph R. Strayer. The book is infuriating and at the same time, indispensable. 477 pp. While 80% of this work is brilliant scholarship, the other 20% make the tabloids look like peer-reviewed journals! Norman F. Cantor. Inventing the Middle Ages is a I had never before read a serious assessment of the Inklings from an academic historian's perspective even though they were by and large academic historians themselves. on the unique perspective each of the medievalists brought to bear on It lacks footnotes Economic history receives only at the University of Manitoba in 1951. in the twentieth century. Access-restricted-item true Addeddate 2014-12-10 18:25:57.107896 Bookplateleaf … Popular but scholarly historical writing is not so hard to come by. Weird concept, but actually very illuminating of the field and engaging too, since everything is going on against the backdrop of 20th century upheavals. New York: Morrow, 1991. their successes have been a result of good "marketing" (and the desire The medieval world was not simply excavated through systematic research. Cantor ( Inventing the Middle Ages ), a professor of history, sociology and comparative literature at New York University, here presents lively and engaging portraits of five men and three women whose idealism exerted great influence during the medieval era, beginning with Helena Augusta (c.255-329), the mother of Constantine the Great, and ending with John Duke of … Every single chapter in this book was endlessly fascinating. than the slightest taint of marxism. Though I've no intention of concentrating on Medieval studies, I found this book very interesting. There are no discussion topics on this book yet. the structure of French academia. A 1980 study shows a conviction level of indicted people—not much higher than in New York City today—of only 35 percent in about the year 1320. King Arthur; the Wilsonian program is compared with the state building Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published popular analogies, too: he writes about "the counterculture ruminations Cantor goes into the biographical details of his subjects' lives only at all interested in medieval history I recommend adding it to yours. work, or where they have their own attractions. All those terms alone seem somewhat inadequate—perhaps some combination of all of them, with maybe a couple more thrown in. Now I understand why this is important to lover's of fantasy. After reading this book one may legitimately talk trash about various historians. The Lives, Works, and Ideas of the Great Medievalists of the Twentieth Century In this ground-breaking work, Norman Cantor explains how our current notion of the Middle Ages-with its vivid images of wars, tournaments, plagues, saints and kings, knights and ladies-was born in the twentieth century. Juries were reluctant to convict the very young, women, the senile, or first offenders with good reputations. "transformed into an intellectual deity whose shrine demanded worship Norman Cantor writes of the life and times of 20 medieval historians from 1900 to now. Norman Cantor (1991) takes the various approaches to medieval historiography and uses them to illustrate scholarship in general, and from there draws a number of interesting conclusions about modern politics, religion, and social life (Cantor, 410-414). inclusion of brief accounts of other figures of note in medieval studies than about Gilson's, for example. pub 1991. later prntg. the plough in the introduction and noncommittal asides on Lynn White's That being said I still learned a few things from this book about the medieval period and the early 20th century. The concepts in the book, I think, aren't only exclusively applicable to Medieval history (and the invention of its image) but also to other Historical disciplines as well (for example, I think, Orientalism and how 'Othering' creates an image or a "type" for both the 'Othered' and the one who 'Others'). Norman Cantor surveys the works of the most influential, and even some of the marginal, medievalists of the 20th century. Einhard's life of Charlemagne; an extended analogy links Southern with This is a moving, if idiosyncratic, historiographical meditation on the rise of "modern" medieval studies (to be distinguished from those of the nineteenth century). Cantor focuses … Cantor takes as his purpose the outlining of the birth and growth of medieval studies as an academic field and discussing how the main players in each of the phases of its development that he has identified shaped our perception of the middle ages by incorporating their own generational, societal, and personal concerns into what was ostensibly an impartial research of the facts. It was also very easy to understand, though perhaps the author had intended for the book to be understood easily. He jumps around through the 20th century, touching on English, French, German, and American medievalists who studied art, literature, kingship, law, and social relations. I knew this book and I were not going to be friends at Chapter 1, where Cantor reduces all of the early Middle Ages (my area of study and interest) to a period of backward barbarism, especially when compared with the gloriously advanced 12th century (and onward). list as a result of reading Inventing the Middle Ages and if you are I had never before read a serious assessment of the Inklings from an academic historian's perspective even though they were. A tell-all gossip book about...medievalists? explores the legacy of Woodrow Wilson in the history of the United States; Cantor is far from dismissive of them, which in 1990 when this book was published cannot have been a very respectable perspective. relates personal memories of Southern, Strayer, and Mommsen (and of a [4] Upon retirement in 1999, Cantor moved to Miami , Florida , where he continued to work on several books up to the time of his death, including the New York Times bestseller In the Wake of the Plague (2001). If you want me to dislike a book, just un-ironically refer to the years 500-1000 as "the Dark Ages.". In this ground-breaking work, Norman Cantor explains how our current notion of the Middle Ages-with its vivid images of wars, tournaments, plagues, saints and kings, knights and ladies-was born in the twentieth century. Personal information about them is the only mentions of technology are a single paragraph on agriculture and Inventing Norman Cantor: Confessions of a Medievalist. Cantor also He shows that the mental picture that contemporary people (or at least medievalists) have of the Middle Ages was painstakingly crafted by the meticulous and imaginative yet highly personal labors of a handful of intellectuals. Norman Cantor (1991) takes the various approaches to medieval historiography and uses them to illustrate scholarship in general, and from there draws a number of interesting conclusions about modern politics, religion, and social life (Cantor, 410-414). These are minor foibles, however. Thus we have the specific interests and preconcept. He died in 2004. This is not a "history" of the period, it is rather, a thoughtful and sometimes very opinionated collection of essays that take us into the academic research of significant Medievalists Cantor (who is one of my favorite Historians to read) has himself studied and. For another, I wasn't persuaded that these academics, many of whom were colleagues and teachers of the editor, made that much impact even on later generations of academics. Publication date 1993 Topics Middle Ages -- Historiography -- History -- 20th century. history"; in their place we will see a retromedieval revival which will He suggests that "visionary university presidents ... will begin interwoven with summaries of their historical work. In my forthcoming book Medieval Wisdom for Modern Protestants, a number of British writers will serve as guides into the period: C S Lewis, J R R Tolkien, G K Chesterton, Dorothy L Sayers and others.The medievalist Norman Cantor, in his 1991 book Inventing the Middle Ages, spends a chapter talking about how Lewis, Tolkien, and their Oxford colleague Frederick Maurice Powicke shaped … Cantor has his own biases, and subtle innuendos permeate his work, I would skip this book. He died in 2004. I don't share Norman Cantor's taste for psychoanalysis, but otherwise this is a fantastic, witty, even profound history of how our knowledge of the middle ages was produced over the last century and a half. In this ground-breaking work, Norman Cantor explains how our current notion of the Middle Ages-with its vivid images of wars, tournaments, plagues, saints and kings, knights and ladies-was born in the twentieth century. I especially like his footnotes and suggested Core Bibliography in Medieval Studies and suggested films. Lots of detail of the individual historians ratherthan of the history. He is I've been reading almost exclusively out of the Annales school, like a blind man, having no idea that there were other areas to explore (more accurately, what those avenues might be). Cantor unravels the "common man's ethos" in J.R.R. For me, a major highlight was the chapter on "the Oxford fantasists" notably CS Lewis and JRR Tolkien. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. An examination of prominent historians since 1905. It was also very easy to understand, though perhaps the author had intended for the book to be understood easily. The subtitle of the book should read “Professor Guilty of Sex Scandal: Cantor Tells All!” Then again, that is also why the book is so highly entertaining. Alongside Bloch by Harper Perennial. has drafted a riveting chapter of 20th-century intellectual history. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. The concepts in the book, I think, aren't only exclusively applicable to Medieval history (and the invention of its image) but also to other Historical disciplines as well (for example, I think, Orientalism and how 'Othering' creates an image or a "type" for both the 'Othered' and the o. In his books Inventing the Middle Ages (1991) and Inventing Norman Cantor (2002), he reflected on his strained relationship over the years with other historians and with academia in general. It lacks footnotes or references, but it has a core bibliography (of medieval studies works available in English) and endnotes with brief bibliographic annotations to each chapter. His many books include In the Wake of the Plague, Inventing the Middle Ages, and The Civilization of the Middle Ages, the most widely read narrative of the Middle Ages in the English language. Cantor takes as his purpose the outlining of the birth and growth of medieval studies as an academic field and discussing how the main players in each of the phases of its development that he has identified shaped our perception of the middle ages by incorporating their own generational, societal, and personal concerns into what was ostensibly an impartial research of the facts. Norman F. Cantor was Emeritus Professor of History, Sociology, and Comparative Literature at New York University. disparaging of the entire Annalist school, for example, insinuating that However, I can pick up on the over use of outdated Freudian psychoanalysis when the author describes and contemplates the actions of these historians. The medieval world was not simply excavated through systematic research. I have little background in medievalist studies so much of this flew over my head. Middle Ages, The term Middle Ages refers to the period between the decline of the Roman Empire, which began around 400 a.d., and the beginning of the Renaissance… Charles Homer Haskins, Charles Homer Haskins American historian Charles Homer Haskins (1870-1937) was a leading authority on Norman culture and an important academic admini… Dark Ages, The Dark Ages is a designation for the … He invents his own Middle Ages: one that tells us to reject the "regulatory and welfare state" and reassert the values of civil society and "tough love." Read Book Inventing The Middle Ages Norman F Cantor Inventing The Middle Ages Norman F Cantor As recognized, adventure as with ease as experience more or less lesson, amusement, as capably as settlement can be gotten by just checking out a books inventing the middle ages norman f cantor after that it is not directly done, you could understand even more going on for this life, almost the world. Tracing the ``quest'' for the Middle Ages, Cantor (History, Sociology, Comparative Lit./N.Y.U. Start by marking “Inventing the Middle Ages” as Want to Read: Error rating book. INVENTING THE MIDDLE AGES. ... %A Cantor, Norman F. %I William Morrow %D 1991 %O paperback, … This is a phenomenal book, a kind of parallel history of the Middle Ages and the twentieth century combined with biographical sketches and book reviews of the great twentieth-century medievalists and their work. However, I can pick up on the over use of outdated Freudian psychoanalysis when the author describes and contemplates the actions of these historians. In this ground-breaking work, Norman Cantor explains how our current notion of the Middle Ages—with its vivid images of wars, tournaments, plagues, saints and kings, knights and ladies—was born in the 20th century. Sporadically intriguing but not enough to really make me feel it worth my while. This illustrates just how strongly idealist his philosophy of history is. followers", for example, and compares Maitland's study of parliament in Cantor offers more For one, it's dry as dust and evoked little interest in the various (I think there were 20) academics who supposedly did so much to shape the modern view of the Middle Ages. The chapter on Haskins and Strayer Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Occasional Publications 1. What Norman Cantor has done is to write a book about the historians of the last hundred years who were responsible for creating the current idea or image of the medieval period—for “inventing the Middle Ages.” Cantor gives special recognition to twenty medievalists by including their names in his chapter headings, but he spends much more time on some than on others. Inventing the Middle Ages, while compulsively readable, is both infuriating and wrong. We’d love your help. Historiographically wrongheaded? Any suggestions? Thank God I'm finished. Readers have a lot to look forward to this year! He went on to get his master's degree in 1953 from Princeton University and spent a year as a Rhodes Scholar at the University of Oxford. So we have accounts I completely understand reviewers who detested it, but it seems to me that people who work in the field (I started out in it and departed many moons ago) owe it to themselves to read this and take a stand. His many books include In the Wake of the Plague, Inventing the Middle Ages, and The Civilization of the Middle Ages, the most widely read narrative of the Middle Ages in the English language. Finally, this book demonstrated the mighty disconnect by elite scholastics whose personal agendas tend to be more important than historical truth. A raging douchebag? Though I've no intention of concentrating on Medieval studies, I found this book very interesting. Finally, this book demonstrated the mighty disconnect by elite scholastics whose personal agendas t. Sorry to say this book failed me in several respects. I have little background in medievalist studies so much of this flew over my head. Enjoyable, informative and fun reading. Having finished this book, I've sat and pondered for a while how best to describe Norman Cantor. For me, a major highlight was the chapter on "the Oxford fantasists" notably CS Lewis and JRR Tolkien. A very informative and entertaining reading. seems more forgiving of racism, anti-semitism, or even outright nazism INVENTING THE MIDDLE AGES The Lives, Works, and Ideas of the Great Medievalists of the Twentieth Century In this ground-breaking work, Norman Cantor explains how our current notion of the Middle Ages-with its vivid images of wars, tournaments, plagues, saints and kings, knights and ladies-was born in the twentieth century. In response, judges did what criminal justice officials in New York do today. The Lives, Works, and Ideas of the Great Medievalists of the Twentieth Century. The European Middle Ages have intrigued me since my youth - an interest I think is shared by many young people who become captivated by books and films that delve into the myths and tales of this very rich period in our Western memory. mixture of scholarly assessment with popular style. about Knowles' private life, with its elements of mystery and scandal, Inventing The Middle Ages INVENTING THE MIDDLE AGES The Lives, Works, and Ideas of the Great Medievalists of the Twentieth Century In this ground-breaking work, Norman Cantor explains how our current notion of the Middle Ages-with its vivid images of wars, tournaments, plagues, saints and kings, knights and ladies-was born in the twentieth century. It was written before Universities went off the rails by a professor who had connections on both sides of the Atlantic, even wikipedia described Cantor as ‘intellectually conservative and expressed deep skepticism about what he saw as methodological fads, particularly Marxism and postmodernism’ etc. INVENTING THE MIDDLE AGES. Norman F. Cantor was Emeritus Professor of History, Sociology, and Comparative Literature at New York University. They began to resort to plea bargaining.”, National Book Critics Circle Award Nominee for Criticism (1991), The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon), Controversies: High Level Catholic Apologetics - Newman, Belloc, Knox, Lunn, Thurston. the discipline. He writes far more Inventing the Middle Ages: The Lives, Works, and Ideas of the Great Medievalists of the Twentieth Century. The medieval world was not simply excavated through systematic research. 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